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DES MOINES, Iowa – (Feb. 20, 2019) – MidAmerican Energy Company today announced its support for legislation that advances renewable energy policy by supporting customer fairness.

The policy eliminates the shifting of electric grid costs from those who can afford private solar to all other customers and gives customers more options for connecting solar to the electric grid. House Study Bill 185 is also known as the “Solar Options Lead to Affordable Renewables (SOLAR) Act,” because of its focus on advancing solar as Iowa’s next renewable energy resource.

“Growth is possible when policies allow all customers to benefit from renewable energy. If this legislation can fix the cost-shift, then solar energy can have an even brighter future in Iowa, just like wind has experienced in the past decade,” Adam Wright, MidAmerican Energy president and CEO, said. “Common sense legislation focused on keeping costs low and affordable for everyone provides the best opportunity to grow solar in Iowa,” Wright added. “The SOLAR Act makes fair changes that ensure customers who don’t want or can’t afford a rooftop system don’t pay for another customer’s decision.”

The Iowa Energy Plan, established in 2016 after an extensive process of stakeholder engagement, is the foundation and roadmap to realizing Iowa’s economic potential, building on the past energy successes and laying the ground work necessary to reaffirm Iowa’s energy leadership into the future. This proposed policy change is consistent with the Iowa Energy Plan, which positions Iowa to continue to lead in renewable energy, while offering nationally competitive electric rates that help drive Iowa’s economy.

Current disparity in customer grid costs
Currently, the costs of building, operating and maintaining the electric grid are recovered through a monthly energy charge. Customers who own solar and generate their own energy don’t pay as much – or any – energy charge. This means they don’t pay for their use of the electric grid. Instead, other customers who don’t have their own solar pay for these costs.

The average MidAmerican Energy residential customer without solar generating equipment currently pays an average of $328 per year for use of the grid. Private solar generators avoid paying some or all of their grid costs, depending on their solar installation and energy use. The solar energy industry foresees continued growth of private solar in Iowa, increasing the amount of costs shifted between customers and likely resulting in future increased grid costs for non-solar customers.

The current solar policy is even more imbalanced when you consider private solar owners use the electric grid in more ways than those without solar – but avoid paying for it. That’s because while most customers simply draw energy from the grid, private solar owners require grid access that’s akin to a two-way street – their energy moves in both directions. When they overproduce energy they ship it out to the grid, and vice versa.

“We ensure the electric grid has reliable service 24/7 for all of our customers, including private generation customers who are super-users because they both receive and send energy through the grid,” Wright said. “We embrace and value our solar customers, but we must not allow the cost-shift that exists to negatively impact our other customers. Private solar customers use the grid for all but about 40 seconds of an average day because they’re almost always either receiving or sending energy. This means they are not off the grid, and it’s reasonable to expect all customers to equitably share the costs of it – whether they receive energy, send it, or both.”

SOLAR Bill does not eliminate tax credits or net metering
Wright noted that the proposed legislation would not affect federal, state or local tax subsidies that solar customers currently receive, which cover at least half of the cost of a typical residential solar installation.

Wright also noted that the bill does not eliminate net metering. With net metering, a customer that owns private solar can “bank” excess energy and use it to offset their bill when their energy needs are greater than the energy they produce. Under the proposed legislation, net metering is still one of a menu of billing options solar customers could choose. Also, HSB 185 would grandfather current solar energy customers to maintain the pricing and payment structure they currently have.

About MidAmerican Energy Company
MidAmerican Energy Company, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, serves 770,000 electric customers and 751,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. Information about MidAmerican Energy is available at midamericanenergy.com and company social media channels.
DES MOINES, Iowa – (Feb. 12, 2019) – MidAmerican Energy Company today dispatched additional crews to the Quad Cities area. Ice has accumulated overnight on power lines and trees, and winds are forecast to increase later on Tuesday.

Though MidAmerican Energy customers experienced some isolated outages early Tuesday, weather conditions did not substantially impact the system. However, gusty winds may cause more significant impacts to already ice-coated power lines and tree limbs.

“When ice accumulates on power lines and the wind increases, that can cause a phenomenon we call galloping. That’s what happens when wind pushes on the lines and lifts them up, in essence causing them to gallop or jump up and down,” Jim Dougherty, vice president of electric delivery, said. “We’re also concerned about ice-covered limbs that can fall onto our lines and equipment.”

The company has dispatched additional line crews and tree trimming crews to the Quad Cities as a precaution. MidAmerican Energy dispatched the additional company and contractor crews from Iowa City, Waterloo and Des Moines, and has put additional crews on standby.

Never touch a downed line
Assume that any downed utility line is energized and dangerous, and do not touch a line. If you see a downed power line, call MidAmerican Energy immediately at 800-799-4443.

Notify MidAmerican Energy if a power outage occurs in your area
If you are a MidAmerican Energy customer and your power goes out, notify the company as soon as possible to help crews pinpoint impacted areas and restore service more quickly. Customers can report the outage online or call 800-799-4443.

Never assume someone else has reported a power outage. If you lose power during a storm, report the outage. This information helps the company pinpoint the source of an outage and can speed the restoration process.

Outage information available 24/7 online, from smartphones, tablets and desktops
My Account, where customers sign up for outage alerts, is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. In addition to signing up for outage notifications, customers can view their energy use, pay bills and view payment history, among other options.

About MidAmerican Energy Company
MidAmerican Energy Company, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, serves 770,000 electric customers and 751,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. Information about MidAmerican Energy is available at midamericanenergy.com and company social media channels.
DES MOINES, Iowa – (Jan. 30, 2019) – When winter temperatures are closer to normal, MidAmerican Energy Company urges all of its customers to turn down their thermostats at night to save energy.

But with dangerous cold bearing down on much of the Midwest, some customers may be better off setting their thermostat and leaving it at a steady temperature – at least temporarily.

By setting their thermostat to a comfortable temperature around the clock during extreme cold, customers with a less efficient home or less reliable furnace can lessen the load on the furnace, because it won’t have to work as hard in the morning to reach a comfortable temperature.

“When temperatures become potentially life-threatening, we want our customers to focus on doing whatever it takes to stay safe and warm indoors,” Tina Hoffman, MidAmerican Energy communications director, said.

Customers with more efficient homes and furnaces can continue to set back their temperature at night to save energy and money – or program a smart thermostat to do it automatically.

Those concerned about their furnace efficiency or optimizing home heat should contact a trusted heating and cooling professional.

MidAmerican Energy offers more tips to help customers keep their homes warm during the unusually frigid cold snap:

• Make sure your interior supply and return air vents, baseboards and radiators are clear so that warm air can circulate indoors.
• If your home furnace has outdoor plastic intake and exhaust vent pipes, clear away snow and ice to make sure they’re not blocked.
• Check your furnace filter. If the filter is dirty, replace it according to the furnace manufacturer’s recommendations.
• If you have window curtains, keep them closed as they may help stop cold air that leaks in through your windows.
• If you feel cold air drafting in through windows or doors, consider adding weather stripping around your windows and doors.
• Do not use a gas stove to heat your home and do not run a generator indoors.
• A working carbon monoxide detector is just as important as a smoke alarm. Test both regularly. Carbon monoxide is odorless, and can cause flu-like symptoms – even death. If you suspect CO poisoning, dial 911, seek fresh air and remain outside or elsewhere until help arrives.
• Hire a professional to inspect and service your furnace once a year to make sure it’s working correctly – that will help keep you safe and warm during the next cold snap.

MidAmerican Energy encourages any customer who is experiencing financial difficulties to call 888-427-5632 to discuss payment options.

About MidAmerican Energy Company
MidAmerican Energy Company, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, serves 770,000 electric customers and 751,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. Information about MidAmerican Energy is available at midamericanenergy.com and company social media channels.
DES MOINES, Iowa – (Dec. 27, 2018) – A change in state law means MidAmerican Energy Company’s Iowa customers will soon see a monthly “energy efficiency charge” on their utility bills – though customers are not actually paying a new fee.

Beginning in January, Iowa’s regulated utilities, including MidAmerican Energy, will show energy efficiency fees on a separate line on monthly customer bills. Utilities are required to use the fees to fund energy efficiency programs. MidAmerican Energy does not profit from the fees, and the money collected is passed through to other customers to support their energy-saving projects.

Law to lift ban on fee disclosure in January
The legislation, signed into law in May, requires utilities to itemize the energy efficiency charge beginning January 1. That’s a significant change from the previous law that has barred utilities from listing the charge on monthly bills and required them to include the fee in the energy rate charge.

“Most of our Iowa customers, along with other regulated utility customers in the state, probably don’t know they are paying the monthly energy efficiency fee, which funds energy efficiency programs,” Kathryn Kunert, MidAmerican Energy’s vice president of economic connections and integration, said. “That changes in January, when the law will require utilities to list the fee. We welcome that transparency, and we think our customers will, too.”

Customers to see lower energy efficiency program charges later in 2019
The law will also reduce MidAmerican Energy customer utility bills by capping energy efficiency program spending. In 2017, MidAmerican Energy’s Iowa customers paid, on average, more than 7 percent of their bills toward energy efficiency programs, the highest in the nation. During that 12-month period, an average single family home paid $145.16, including $67.50 on electric and $77.66 on natural gas bills for energy efficiency programs.

The legislation will limit energy efficiency program spending at 2 percent for electric and 1.5 percent for natural gas. The spending caps will save MidAmerican Energy customers an estimated $80 - $90 million annually. On average, it will save about $81 per year for MidAmerican Energy’s residential gas and electric customers, $172 for commercial and more than $12,000 for industrial energy users.

Once the Iowa Utilities Board issues a ruling on MidAmerican Energy’s latest proposed energy efficiency program spending plan, which the board must file by the end of March, the company’s Iowa customers will pay reduced energy efficiency charges. Those reductions will take effect later in the year, depending on the board’s ruling.

While MidAmerican Energy customers will pay less each month, the company will continue to offer energy efficiency programs and customer energy savings incentives.

“Since our Iowa customers will pay less every month into an energy efficiency fund, they are now able to make more of their own spending decisions,” Kunert said. “Customers will also continue to benefit from robust energy efficiency programs, in addition to the clean, renewable energy that MidAmerican delivers to them.”

New look for monthly bill
Separately, MidAmerican Energy customers will see a new monthly bill format beginning in January. MidAmerican Energy redesigned the bill, based on customer input, to make it easier to understand monthly energy use and charges.

About MidAmerican Energy Company
MidAmerican Energy Company, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, serves 770,000 electric customers and 751,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. Information about MidAmerican Energy is available at MidAmericanEnergy.com and company social media channels.


DES MOINES, Iowa – (Feb. 20, 2019) – MidAmerican Energy Company today announced its support for legislation that advances renewable energy policy by supporting customer fairness.

The policy eliminates the shifting of electric grid costs from those who can afford private solar to all other customers and gives customers more options for connecting solar to the electric grid. House Study Bill 185 is also known as the “Solar Options Lead to Affordable Renewables (SOLAR) Act,” because of its focus on advancing solar as Iowa’s next renewable energy resource.

“Growth is possible when policies allow all customers to benefit from renewable energy. If this legislation can fix the cost-shift, then solar energy can have an even brighter future in Iowa, just like wind has experienced in the past decade,” Adam Wright, MidAmerican Energy president and CEO, said. “Common sense legislation focused on keeping costs low and affordable for everyone provides the best opportunity to grow solar in Iowa,” Wright added. “The SOLAR Act makes fair changes that ensure customers who don’t want or can’t afford a rooftop system don’t pay for another customer’s decision.”

The Iowa Energy Plan, established in 2016 after an extensive process of stakeholder engagement, is the foundation and roadmap to realizing Iowa’s economic potential, building on the past energy successes and laying the ground work necessary to reaffirm Iowa’s energy leadership into the future. This proposed policy change is consistent with the Iowa Energy Plan, which positions Iowa to continue to lead in renewable energy, while offering nationally competitive electric rates that help drive Iowa’s economy.

Current disparity in customer grid costs
Currently, the costs of building, operating and maintaining the electric grid are recovered through a monthly energy charge. Customers who own solar and generate their own energy don’t pay as much – or any – energy charge. This means they don’t pay for their use of the electric grid. Instead, other customers who don’t have their own solar pay for these costs.

The average MidAmerican Energy residential customer without solar generating equipment currently pays an average of $328 per year for use of the grid. Private solar generators avoid paying some or all of their grid costs, depending on their solar installation and energy use. The solar energy industry foresees continued growth of private solar in Iowa, increasing the amount of costs shifted between customers and likely resulting in future increased grid costs for non-solar customers.

The current solar policy is even more imbalanced when you consider private solar owners use the electric grid in more ways than those without solar – but avoid paying for it. That’s because while most customers simply draw energy from the grid, private solar owners require grid access that’s akin to a two-way street – their energy moves in both directions. When they overproduce energy they ship it out to the grid, and vice versa.

“We ensure the electric grid has reliable service 24/7 for all of our customers, including private generation customers who are super-users because they both receive and send energy through the grid,” Wright said. “We embrace and value our solar customers, but we must not allow the cost-shift that exists to negatively impact our other customers. Private solar customers use the grid for all but about 40 seconds of an average day because they’re almost always either receiving or sending energy. This means they are not off the grid, and it’s reasonable to expect all customers to equitably share the costs of it – whether they receive energy, send it, or both.”

SOLAR Bill does not eliminate tax credits or net metering
Wright noted that the proposed legislation would not affect federal, state or local tax subsidies that solar customers currently receive, which cover at least half of the cost of a typical residential solar installation.

Wright also noted that the bill does not eliminate net metering. With net metering, a customer that owns private solar can “bank” excess energy and use it to offset their bill when their energy needs are greater than the energy they produce. Under the proposed legislation, net metering is still one of a menu of billing options solar customers could choose. Also, HSB 185 would grandfather current solar energy customers to maintain the pricing and payment structure they currently have.

About MidAmerican Energy Company
MidAmerican Energy Company, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, serves 770,000 electric customers and 751,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. Information about MidAmerican Energy is available at midamericanenergy.com and company social media channels.
DES MOINES, Iowa – (Feb. 12, 2019) – MidAmerican Energy Company today dispatched additional crews to the Quad Cities area. Ice has accumulated overnight on power lines and trees, and winds are forecast to increase later on Tuesday.

Though MidAmerican Energy customers experienced some isolated outages early Tuesday, weather conditions did not substantially impact the system. However, gusty winds may cause more significant impacts to already ice-coated power lines and tree limbs.

“When ice accumulates on power lines and the wind increases, that can cause a phenomenon we call galloping. That’s what happens when wind pushes on the lines and lifts them up, in essence causing them to gallop or jump up and down,” Jim Dougherty, vice president of electric delivery, said. “We’re also concerned about ice-covered limbs that can fall onto our lines and equipment.”

The company has dispatched additional line crews and tree trimming crews to the Quad Cities as a precaution. MidAmerican Energy dispatched the additional company and contractor crews from Iowa City, Waterloo and Des Moines, and has put additional crews on standby.

Never touch a downed line
Assume that any downed utility line is energized and dangerous, and do not touch a line. If you see a downed power line, call MidAmerican Energy immediately at 800-799-4443.

Notify MidAmerican Energy if a power outage occurs in your area
If you are a MidAmerican Energy customer and your power goes out, notify the company as soon as possible to help crews pinpoint impacted areas and restore service more quickly. Customers can report the outage online or call 800-799-4443.

Never assume someone else has reported a power outage. If you lose power during a storm, report the outage. This information helps the company pinpoint the source of an outage and can speed the restoration process.

Outage information available 24/7 online, from smartphones, tablets and desktops
My Account, where customers sign up for outage alerts, is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. In addition to signing up for outage notifications, customers can view their energy use, pay bills and view payment history, among other options.

About MidAmerican Energy Company
MidAmerican Energy Company, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, serves 770,000 electric customers and 751,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. Information about MidAmerican Energy is available at midamericanenergy.com and company social media channels.
DES MOINES, Iowa – (Jan. 30, 2019) – When winter temperatures are closer to normal, MidAmerican Energy Company urges all of its customers to turn down their thermostats at night to save energy.

But with dangerous cold bearing down on much of the Midwest, some customers may be better off setting their thermostat and leaving it at a steady temperature – at least temporarily.

By setting their thermostat to a comfortable temperature around the clock during extreme cold, customers with a less efficient home or less reliable furnace can lessen the load on the furnace, because it won’t have to work as hard in the morning to reach a comfortable temperature.

“When temperatures become potentially life-threatening, we want our customers to focus on doing whatever it takes to stay safe and warm indoors,” Tina Hoffman, MidAmerican Energy communications director, said.

Customers with more efficient homes and furnaces can continue to set back their temperature at night to save energy and money – or program a smart thermostat to do it automatically.

Those concerned about their furnace efficiency or optimizing home heat should contact a trusted heating and cooling professional.

MidAmerican Energy offers more tips to help customers keep their homes warm during the unusually frigid cold snap:

• Make sure your interior supply and return air vents, baseboards and radiators are clear so that warm air can circulate indoors.
• If your home furnace has outdoor plastic intake and exhaust vent pipes, clear away snow and ice to make sure they’re not blocked.
• Check your furnace filter. If the filter is dirty, replace it according to the furnace manufacturer’s recommendations.
• If you have window curtains, keep them closed as they may help stop cold air that leaks in through your windows.
• If you feel cold air drafting in through windows or doors, consider adding weather stripping around your windows and doors.
• Do not use a gas stove to heat your home and do not run a generator indoors.
• A working carbon monoxide detector is just as important as a smoke alarm. Test both regularly. Carbon monoxide is odorless, and can cause flu-like symptoms – even death. If you suspect CO poisoning, dial 911, seek fresh air and remain outside or elsewhere until help arrives.
• Hire a professional to inspect and service your furnace once a year to make sure it’s working correctly – that will help keep you safe and warm during the next cold snap.

MidAmerican Energy encourages any customer who is experiencing financial difficulties to call 888-427-5632 to discuss payment options.

About MidAmerican Energy Company
MidAmerican Energy Company, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, serves 770,000 electric customers and 751,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. Information about MidAmerican Energy is available at midamericanenergy.com and company social media channels.
DES MOINES, Iowa – (Dec. 27, 2018) – A change in state law means MidAmerican Energy Company’s Iowa customers will soon see a monthly “energy efficiency charge” on their utility bills – though customers are not actually paying a new fee.

Beginning in January, Iowa’s regulated utilities, including MidAmerican Energy, will show energy efficiency fees on a separate line on monthly customer bills. Utilities are required to use the fees to fund energy efficiency programs. MidAmerican Energy does not profit from the fees, and the money collected is passed through to other customers to support their energy-saving projects.

Law to lift ban on fee disclosure in January
The legislation, signed into law in May, requires utilities to itemize the energy efficiency charge beginning January 1. That’s a significant change from the previous law that has barred utilities from listing the charge on monthly bills and required them to include the fee in the energy rate charge.

“Most of our Iowa customers, along with other regulated utility customers in the state, probably don’t know they are paying the monthly energy efficiency fee, which funds energy efficiency programs,” Kathryn Kunert, MidAmerican Energy’s vice president of economic connections and integration, said. “That changes in January, when the law will require utilities to list the fee. We welcome that transparency, and we think our customers will, too.”

Customers to see lower energy efficiency program charges later in 2019
The law will also reduce MidAmerican Energy customer utility bills by capping energy efficiency program spending. In 2017, MidAmerican Energy’s Iowa customers paid, on average, more than 7 percent of their bills toward energy efficiency programs, the highest in the nation. During that 12-month period, an average single family home paid $145.16, including $67.50 on electric and $77.66 on natural gas bills for energy efficiency programs.

The legislation will limit energy efficiency program spending at 2 percent for electric and 1.5 percent for natural gas. The spending caps will save MidAmerican Energy customers an estimated $80 - $90 million annually. On average, it will save about $81 per year for MidAmerican Energy’s residential gas and electric customers, $172 for commercial and more than $12,000 for industrial energy users.

Once the Iowa Utilities Board issues a ruling on MidAmerican Energy’s latest proposed energy efficiency program spending plan, which the board must file by the end of March, the company’s Iowa customers will pay reduced energy efficiency charges. Those reductions will take effect later in the year, depending on the board’s ruling.

While MidAmerican Energy customers will pay less each month, the company will continue to offer energy efficiency programs and customer energy savings incentives.

“Since our Iowa customers will pay less every month into an energy efficiency fund, they are now able to make more of their own spending decisions,” Kunert said. “Customers will also continue to benefit from robust energy efficiency programs, in addition to the clean, renewable energy that MidAmerican delivers to them.”

New look for monthly bill
Separately, MidAmerican Energy customers will see a new monthly bill format beginning in January. MidAmerican Energy redesigned the bill, based on customer input, to make it easier to understand monthly energy use and charges.

About MidAmerican Energy Company
MidAmerican Energy Company, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, serves 770,000 electric customers and 751,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. Information about MidAmerican Energy is available at MidAmericanEnergy.com and company social media channels.

DES MOINES, Iowa – (Nov. 8, 2018) – MidAmerican Energy Company today announced plans to install a utility-scale battery energy storage system.

An energy storage system enables a utility to store electricity for later use.

The battery project provides 4 megawatt-hours of storage capacity and can supply 1 MW of power for up to four hours. 1 MW is enough electricity to power about 900 average Iowa homes.

Chicago-based Invenergy will install the lithium-iron phosphate battery system, housed in two truck-sized steel containers, at a MidAmerican Energy substation in Knoxville. The new system is expected to begin operating by the end of next month.

“This innovative project will help us learn how best to use an energy storage system, and how it can serve our customers in the future,” Mike Fehr, MidAmerican Energy vice president of resource development, said. “Energy storage has the potential to allow us to retain energy when customer demand is low and release it during peak usage times. That would give us new options to manage peak loads, enhance overall reliability and help keep electric costs low and affordable for our customers.”

Large-scale energy storage has the potential to provide several benefits, including:

• Flattening peaks and valleys of electric generation by enabling energy companies to generate and store electricity at times of low demand and release it when demand is high.
• Reducing the operating time of peaking generators, which generally run only when there is a high demand and are a relatively expensive form of generation.
• Enhancing renewable energy’s reliability by storing energy produced when wind speeds and sun exposure are high and using it later.
• Improving power quality and prolonging transformer life.

“Energy storage is still in the development stages and the economic feasibility on a larger scale is being assessed as well; however, prices are trending downward,” Fehr said. “MidAmerican Energy wants first-hand experience with the technology so we’re positioned to quickly and efficiently add it to our system in ways that benefit our customers when the price is right.”

About MidAmerican Energy Company
MidAmerican Energy Company, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, serves 770,000 electric customers and 751,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. Information about MidAmerican Energy is available at MidAmericanEnergy.com and company social media channels.
DES MOINES, Iowa – (Oct. 17, 2018) – Low-income customers in MidAmerican Energy Company’s Iowa territory can apply for the seasonal Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program. Elderly or disabled low-income Iowans can apply now. Other qualified low-income Iowa residents can apply starting Nov. 1.

LIHEAP is a federally funded energy assistance program designed to help low-income families pay their heating bills. Community action agencies in Iowa review applications and administer grant funds provided by the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Household income and size, type of primary heating fuel, housing type and other factors are considered as grants are awarded to eligible low-income applicants.

“If you are a low-income Iowan and worry about paying your energy bills this winter, or know of someone who does, consider if LIHEAP might be an option,” Mike Gehringer, vice president of customer operations for MidAmerican Energy, said. “Even if you don’t qualify for LIHEAP, and you’re having difficulty paying your energy bills, we encourage you to discuss payment options with us.” Customers can call MidAmerican Energy at 888-427-5632.

To be eligible for LIHEAP, the total household income for an applicant in Iowa must be at or below 175 percent of 2018 federal poverty guidelines. For example, a single-person household can qualify with an annual gross income at or below $21,245. A family of four can qualify with an annual gross income at or below $43,925.

Last year 41,898 households in MidAmerican Energy’s Iowa service territory were approved for LIHEAP assistance. The average grant per household was $420.

Eligible customers who need help with energy bills should apply for LIHEAP at a local community action agency. The Iowa Department of Human Rights has additional information about the program and eligibility requirements.

Budget billing provides predictable monthly bill
MidAmerican Energy customers who want a more consistent monthly energy bill can opt for budget billing, which allows customers to pay the same amount each month for a set period of time. Budget billing does not lower rates, but does offer a more predictable bill.

How you can help low-income customers this winter
To help those in need, customers can donate to MidAmerican Energy’s I CARE program which funds local assistance for heating bills and home weatherization for low-income residents, and is administered through local community action agencies.

Customer donations fund I CARE, together with a 25 percent match from MidAmerican Energy. Tax-deductible donations to the I CARE program stay within the local community and go directly to help those in need. MidAmerican Energy customers can donate to the I CARE program via a checkbox on their monthly bill or can pledge online.

About MidAmerican Energy Company
MidAmerican Energy Company, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, serves 770,000 electric customers and 751,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. Information about MidAmerican Energy is available at midamericanenergy.com and company social media channels.
DES MOINES, Iowa – (Sept. 12, 2018) – Locating the source of a power outage without service crews physically inspecting electric lines and equipment can be difficult, especially during stormy weather and in darkness.

That’s why MidAmerican Energy Company is adding hundreds of smart devices to electric lines – to help restore service more quickly if an outage occurs.

The small electronic sensors, called remote fault indicators, attach to power lines. The devices instantly transmit outage and location details to MidAmerican Energy control room operators if they detect a service interruption.

“This smart grid technology helps us identify and isolate outages more quickly so we can restore service faster to minimize the impact to our customers, and supports our ongoing efforts to increase system reliability for our customers,” Jim Dougherty, MidAmerican Energy vice president of electric delivery, said.

Without the sensors, crews must often physically travel miles of roads, at times on foot for facilities that are not along roadways, to inspect power lines and locate the outage source. That process can take hours.

“When we know the cause of an outage, we can often dispatch our crews and restore service fairly quickly,” Dougherty said. “But the outage source isn’t always obvious. In many cases, our crews must inspect miles of lines, which can be difficult and take time – especially in the dark or during storms. These devices enable us to dispatch crews right to the disruption.”

Since early last year, MidAmerican Energy installed more than 200 sensors at locations in Sioux City, Council Bluffs, Fort Dodge, Des Moines, Waterloo, Iowa City and the Quad Cities, and in rural areas throughout its service territory. Based on the success and accuracy of the sensors thus far, MidAmerican Energy is in the process of installing sensors at more than 150 additional locations, which the company expects to complete next month.

“In an outage, our goal is to restore service as quickly, safely and efficiently as possible. These new sensors help us get the job done,” Dougherty said.

About MidAmerican Energy Company
MidAmerican Energy Company, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, serves 770,000 electric customers and 751,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. Information about MidAmerican Energy is available at midamericanenergy.com and company social media channels.
DES MOINES, Iowa – (Aug. 30, 2018) – In a plan filed today with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, MidAmerican Energy Company proposes a series of measures to help minimize how wind turbines may impact bald eagles and four bat species.

The company’s habitat conservation plan reflects insights gleaned from the most extensive research effort of its kind, spanning four years and covering most of MidAmerican Energy's wind fleet.

The plan aims to help protect four bat species, including two that are federally protected, by modifying nighttime wind turbine operations during certain months, and making additional operational changes at four wind farms where researchers found signs of increased bat activity in the area.

The proposed changes involve adjusting a turbine’s “cut-in” speed, or the wind speed at which a turbine begins to spin and produce energy. Studies show the adjustment can minimize bat fatalities. The changes will slightly decrease electric generation output.

The plan also proposes measures to reduce impacts on bald eagles that may be present near MidAmerican Energy wind farms. It calls for training wind turbine technicians on wildlife search protocols during turbine visits, and educating landowners about removing animal remains that may attract eagles near wind turbines – reducing the odds of an eagle coming in contact with a wind turbine.

In addition to modifying wind turbine operations, MidAmerican Energy proposes to establish a $4.4 million bat conservation fund and a $1.6 million eagle conservation fund to support statewide mitigation projects to offset any impacts to those species.

The company seeks a 30-year U.S. government permit to allow for an average of 10 turbine-related incidental bald eagle “takes” – or deaths – per year across its Iowa service territory. The permit would account for less than a half percent of the eagle population that could be affected by MidAmerican Energy wind farms. The plan also calls for a take permit for four bat species.

“We understand that even though wind energy is clean and renewable, it impacts wildlife,” Jenny McIvor, vice president, environmental programs for MidAmerican Energy, said. “That’s why we’ve worked so hard and spent $15 million to study wildlife impacts at our wind facilities and tailor a conservation plan that specifically addresses those impacts.”

In November 2014, MidAmerican Energy, along with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, began a series of studies to determine how wind farms impact bald eagles and four bat species: Indiana, northern long-eared, little brown and tri-colored bats. The studies examined where sensitive bat species and bald eagles appear near MidAmerican Energy wind farms and evaluated impacts to these species.

The company is using information gathered through the studies to enhance conservation practices for existing wind farms and where the company places new ones.

“MidAmerican Energy is a national leader in generating wind energy,” McIvor said. “Now we’re leading on conservation efforts with this comprehensive plan, which is a gold standard for our wind portfolio and the industry.”

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is expected to take final action on its draft environmental impact statement evaluating the plan by spring 2019 following a public comment period.

MidAmerican Energy wind energy leadership
MidAmerican Energy built its first wind turbine in 2004, and now operates more than 2,100 turbines at 27 wind farms across Iowa. Last year, MidAmerican Energy generated renewable energy equal to about 50 percent of its Iowa customers’ annual use, and announced plans to expand it to 100 percent by the end of 2021.

About MidAmerican Energy
MidAmerican Energy Company is an energy provider serving 770,000 electric customers and 751,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. It is headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa. Information about MidAmerican Energy is available on the company’s website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages, which can be accessed via MidAmerican Energy Company's website.
DES MOINES, Iowa – (Aug. 28, 2018) – MidAmerican Energy Company’s Iowa customers can save energy and save money on the purchase of trees through the company’s “Plant Some Shade” program.

MidAmerican Energy’s residential customers in Iowa can purchase up to two trees through Plant Some Shade. Valued at $65 at retail price, MidAmerican Energy customers can buy trees for $30 each on a first-come, first-served basis. The program offers 3-to-10 feet tall deciduous trees, low-growing ornamental shade trees, and 2-1/2 feet tall conifers.

Deciduous trees, which lose their leaves in the fall, provide shade on summer days to decrease the cooling load on air conditioners. According to USDA Forest Service research, strategically placed mature trees can cut annual air conditioning demands up to 56 percent and heating costs up to three percent.

Low-growing ornamental shade trees and conifers, commonly called evergreens, are often used for windbreaks and can shield homes from winter winds to help ease heating costs.

“We encourage our customers to plant trees around their homes to promote energy efficiency and environmental stewardship,” Tina Yoder, MidAmerican Energy director of energy efficiency, said. “Trees help protect homes from the elements year-round, which helps our customers save energy and money.”

To purchase, MidAmerican Energy customers must complete order forms in advance on the "Plant Trees, Save Energy" page. Trees ordered can be picked up at Plant Some Shade events Oct. 10 in Grimes, Oct. 11 in Waukee, Oct. 13 in Des Moines and Oct. 18 in Sioux City.

Administered by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources and implemented by local partners throughout the state, MidAmerican Energy partners with each to promote the program.

“The Plant Some Shade program is an excellent opportunity for homeowners to purchase high-quality trees at a low price,” Evan Miller, DNR partnership coordinator, said. “Fall is a great time to plant new trees. Warm fall days and cool nights are perfect for tree establishment and root growth.”

For more information, go to MidAmerican Energy’s "Plant Trees, Save Energy" page, email planttrees@midamerican.com, or call 800-434-4017.

About MidAmerican Energy Company
MidAmerican Energy Company, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, serves 770,000 electric customers and 751,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. Information about MidAmerican Energy, is available at midamericanenergy.com and on company social media channels.
DES MOINES, Iowa – (July 12, 2018) – MidAmerican Energy Company today announced construction of a wind farm project to begin this month in west central Grundy County.

The Ivester wind farm includes 35 Siemens Gamesa wind turbines. It’s part of MidAmerican Energy’s Wind XI project, which the company announced in 2016.

When completed at the end of this year, Ivester will add 91 megawatts of wind generation capacity for MidAmerican Energy customers, or enough wind energy to power more than 38,000 average Iowa homes.

The wind farm will add approximately $875,000 in estimated average annual property taxes in Grundy County, in addition to construction, long-term operations and maintenance jobs.

“This is an exciting year for MidAmerican Energy, as the Ivester wind farm is our latest addition that will help us increase wind generating capacity for our customers,” Mike Fehr, MidAmerican Energy vice president of resource development, said.

Wind XI project
The $3.6 billion Wind XI project is scheduled for completion in December 2019. The project will include up to 1,000 wind turbines and add up to 2,000 megawatts of wind generation capacity in Iowa, or enough energy to power more than 840,000 average Iowa homes.

MidAmerican Energy previously announced construction of two Wind XI wind farm projects now underway in Adair County – Arbor Hill and Orient. Beaver Creek II in Greene County, and North English in Poweshiek County, are also under construction. Two additional wind farms, Beaver Creek in Boone and Greene counties, and Prairie in Mahaska County, are now operating.

Wind XII project
On May 30, MidAmerican Energy announced plans to be the first investor-owned electric utility in the nation to generate renewable energy equal to 100 percent of its customers’ usage on an annual basis, upon completing its newest proposed wind energy project. The company expects to complete the project, called Wind XII, in late 2020. Wind XII is subject to Iowa Utilities Board approval.

Wind energy economic benefits
In 2017, MidAmerican Energy paid $19.6 million in Iowa property taxes on its wind farms. These annual payments are in addition to the economic benefits associated with wind energy construction, operations and maintenance jobs in rural areas, wind industry manufacturing jobs, landowner easement payments and renewable energy’s impact in attracting new businesses to the state.

About MidAmerican Energy Company
MidAmerican Energy Company, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, serves 770,000 electric customers and 751,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. Information about MidAmerican Energy is available at midamericanenergy.com and on the company's social media channels.